TOC
Models:

Types of Model Validation DataAnnotations

In the last article, we introduced Model Validation and showed you how easy it is to get started with. We used a couple of the validation-related DataAnnotations, like [Required] and [StringLength], but as mentioned, there are several other types. In this article, I will run through all of them, to give you a better idea of all the possibilities.

[Required]

Specifies that a value needs to be provided for this property. You should be aware that non-nullable value types (e.g. integers and DateTime's) are always required and therefore you don't need to add the [Required] attribute for them. For strings you should have in mind that an empty value will be treated like a NULL value and therefore result in a validation error. This behavior can be changed by using the AllowEmptyStrings property though:

[Required(AllowEmptyStrings = true)]

[StringLength]

Allows you to specify at least a maximum amount of characters (the first, non-optional parameter) for a string, with the added possibility of specifying a minimum amount as well. Here's an example:

[StringLength(50, MinimumLength = 3)]

In this case, the value can't be validated if it's less than 3 characters or more than 50 characters long.

[Range]

With the [Range] attribute, you can specify a minimum and a maximum value for a numeric property (int, float, double etc.). Both a minimum and a maximum is required when you use this attribute - like this:

[Range(1, 100)]

Now your numeric value must be between 1 and 100.

[Compare]

The [Compare] attribute allows you to set up a comparison between the property in question and another property, requiring them to match. A common use case for this could be to ensure that the user enters the same values in both the "Email" and the "EmailRepeated" fields:

[Compare("MailAddressRepeated")]
public string MailAddress { get; set; }

public string MailAddressRepeated { get; set; }

Specific types

If your string falls into a specific category, e.g. a phone number, the ASP.NET MVC can supply you with basic validation out of the box. Here's a list of the types you can specify:

  • [CreditCard]: Validates that the property has a credit card format.
  • [EmailAddress]: Validates that the property has an e-mail format.
  • [Phone]: Validates that the property has a telephone number format.
  • [Url]: Validates that the property has a URL format.

Common for all of these is that they only provide a very basic validation. So for instance, the e-mail validation will only ensure that the entered value will contain some of the characteristics of an e-mail address, like containing an @ character and so on, but it will still be possible to enter something that is not actually an e-mail address. For more accuracy and/or flexibility, use the [RegularExpression] attribute, or implement your own, custom logic, as described in one of the next articles.

[RegularExpression]

When none of the other types of validation are flexible enough, the last resort might very well be the [RegularExpression] attribute. It allows you to specify a Regular Expression which the value of your property will be validated against, and it will only be valid if there's a match. Regular Expressions are way too big a subject to handle in this article, but allow me to demonstrate just how powerful they are anyway. Imagine that your WebUser class has a MemberId which has to be in this specific format:

xx-0000-0000

Or in other words: Two letters, a dash and then two groups of four numbers with a dash between, like zx-1234-5678. We can make a Regular Expression for just that and put it inside our [RegularExpression] attribute:

[RegularExpression("[a-z]{2}-[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{4}")]
public string MemberId { get; set; }

The possibilities with Regular Expressions are almost endless, and they can be used in many other situations than just validation, so learning how to use them can be a good investment! Here's a couple of links if you want to get started learning Regular Expressions: Regex Tutorial & Cheat sheet / Regex Interactive Tutorial.

Summary

With a wide range of validation possibilities already built into the ASP.NET MVC framework, you can easily have most of your properties validated by adding a simple attribute to them. If you need more flexibility, you can always use the [RegularExpression] attribute or a custom implementation of validation logic, as we'll discuss in one of the next articles.